polymyositis

polymyositis

Postby courtneywahl5555 » Tue Nov 18, 2003 8:58 pm

hi... can you guys help me with some specific exercises to help someone with polymyositis...
i have been doing lots of core strengthing, but i really like to vary it up..new ideas would be great.
lots of proximal weakness... \
thanks.
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Postby ali » Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:54 am

My vote is for aquatic therapy! :)

What kind of setting are you in? How mobile is he?
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Postby courtneywahl5555 » Fri Nov 28, 2003 8:33 pm

no water available :(

she can walk about 30 feet with quad cane.
can walk with bilateral UE support on treadmill at .5 for 3 minutes

she can not transfer from supine to side lying
she can not transfer from sit to stand (unless very high seat)
thanks for your help
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Postby ali » Tue Dec 02, 2003 4:49 pm

Do you have access to a Theraball or gym ball? Most of them come with a list of exercise suggestions, and there is also a pack with the VHI Exercise and Rehab outpatient exercise cards and/or computer program. It does sound like core strengthening and pelvic strengthening are major issues. The NDT folks would probably encourage a lot more matwork and less focus on ambulation. I'd also recommend really working on quads and gluts.

Where do you think the problem is with supine-to-sidelying?
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Postby CD » Tue Dec 27, 2005 3:02 pm

I really enjoy working on the mat with 4 pt., tall kneeling,
hemi-kneeling; some crawling and dynamic work with balls...patients find it challenging, and the focus is on core/proximal WB and endurance. Safe as well.

Mix gait training in as well...as an alternative; variation.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby smithgerry » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:47 am

Getting acceptable exercise boost the strength of your core muscles, making it easier for the individual to go about their daily routine. Make sure that you talk to a health care professional before beginning any course of treatment for polymyositis, especially one that involves exercise. Work with a doctor to develop a personalized workout plan tailored to your individual symptoms and medical issues.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby oneman » Fri Jul 02, 2010 7:56 am

My son was recently diagnosed with polymyositis by our family doctor. We were informed that it is an inflammatory disease that effect his legs. Is a high powered prescription of a steroid like predisone the only treatment that reduces the symptoms?
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Re: polymyositis

Postby teraphy » Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:21 pm

To determine the effect of a resistive exercise program in the rehabilitation of patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). METHODS: Five patients participated in a rehabilitation program that included resistive exercises. In 4 of the patients, these exercises were randomly alternated with nonresistive exercise. Each type of exercise was assigned for periods of 2 weeks, and at the end of each one, muscle strength was measured by means of manual muscle testing (MMT), an activities of daily living (ADL) score, and peak isometric torque (PIT) generated by muscle groups in the lower extremities. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were used to measure disease activity. The acute response to resistive exercise was studied in 4 of the patients by measuring serial levels of CPK following a session on an exercise bicycle. RESULTS: Of the 4 patients who participated in both types of exercises, 3 experienced increases in strength during both resistive and nonresistive exercise periods. The patient who participated only in resistive exercises had considerable improvements in muscle strength. One patient made no improvements in strength with either type of exercise. None of the patients experienced clinically significant elevations in CPK attributable to either type of exercise. Following a session of resistive exercise, the mean CPK elevation in 4 patients was 7.7%, returning to pre-exercise levels by 8 h in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PM/DM may participate in a rehabilitation program which includes resistive exercises. Such programs may be accompanied by increased strength without clinically significant rises in serum levels of muscle enzymes.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby franzharare » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:48 am

Well I have just read the all of this stuff. And I just want to say that or I can say that according to me the standard treatment for polymyositis is a corticosteroid drug, given either in pill form or intravenously. And I also want to say that Immunosuppressant drugs, such as azathioprine and methotrexate, may reduce inflammation in people who do not respond well to prednisone.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby aenasmith » Fri Aug 06, 2010 1:57 am

There are some exercises for polymyositis but they should be done under the instruction of the trainer. Though they are not tough but for avoiding any problem it is advisable. Use of a 4 prong cane or a walker while walking would be best exercise for polymyositis.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby leg-pac » Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:19 am

I have created a piece of equipment, called the Leg-PAC, www.leg-pac.com. This equipment is great for patients who are having difficulty with sit to stand, and with ambulation. I find that the hip extensors are often weak, and that exercising the hip extensors and the quads invariably leads to progress with transfers and gait. I use this equipment to prepare the patient for higher level mat work, such as high kneel, one-half kneel etc... I also use this equipment for patients who cannot do mat work do to "bad knees", very painful shoulders which preclude mat work, etc.... The Leg-PAC is more stable than an exercise ball, and can be used in the hospital bed, for exercise. I even use it in the ICU, for patients who have been on prolonged bedrest and are unable to transfer or ambulate well.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby aenajones » Fri Aug 27, 2010 7:36 am

Really nice tips given by leg-pac. These tips are useful. But the exercising must be done with doctor instructions. The people who suffer from these required proper assessment and diagnosis.
I am sure these equipment will be useful.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby sherardsol » Fri Oct 08, 2010 3:23 am

Easy to go about their daily personal creation, the exercise allows you to increase core muscle strength. Including, in particular exercise, polymyositis treatment before starting any course should consult with your healthcare professional. With the doctor on your personal symptoms and medical problems can develop a customized workout plan.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby denismorrisons » Wed Oct 27, 2010 11:28 am

Polymyositis is muscle disease with inflammation of the muscle fibers. Cause of the disease is unknown. It begins when white blood cells, immune cells of inflammation, spontaneously invade muscles. Muscles usually affects mainly the frame or body. This leads to weakness, which can be severe. Polymyositis is a chronic disease, periods of increased symptoms or flares or relapses, and little or no symptoms, called remissions.
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Re: polymyositis

Postby Kenway » Wed Jan 05, 2011 8:54 am

Strength exercises are considered the basic exercises because each exercise targets multiple groups. Some ideal exercises for your program could be squats for the thighs, dead lifts for the hamstrings and back, bench press for the chest, shoulders and triceps, pull-downs for the back and biceps and the military press for shoulders. These exercises work muscles groups together and help build strength
precious thing of world is health
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